Questionnaire

Can you manage across cultures?

 

Can you manage across cultures?

Test whether you have what it takes to manage international teams and to work with people from other cultures. Take 10 minutes to choose your answer to 10 questions testing your practical knowledge and skills.

Question 1: Why is it not appropriate to delete the names of people you don’t know from the cc-list of an e-mail?

Question 2: During a negotiation you make a proposal to your Japanese supplier. Your colleague – who is very experienced working with the Japanese - advices you to immediately call for a break, before you even got an answer from your Japanese supplier. Why is this a good idea?

Question 3: You want your subordinates to think pro-actively about new activities the team could take up, so in a group meeting you make a few suggestions. To your surprise, nobody else comes with suggestions, and the team readily implements the things you brought up. Why is this?

Question 4: When a result has been reached in negotiations, some cultures are hesitant to make a contract in which all agreements are written down. Why is this?

Question 5: Why do employees in collectivistic cultures avoid to give direct, negative feedback to each other?

Question 6: What can be a reason to put your initial demands very high in a negotiation?

Question 7: Why should you not include the question “Do you trust your managers?” in an employee survey in some countries?

Question 8: You ask a question to a colleague from another culture. He tells you a long story with a lot of hand gestures and body language, and the content of the story seems totally irrelevant to you. What might be going on here?

Question 9: Why is it in many countries so important to talk about personal matters (family, etc.) before doing business?

Question 10: In a phone conference with people from Germany, an American or Dutch person can be surprised when the Germans ask very detailed questions about irrelevant side-issues of your offer. What is going on?

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